Rhythm and Roots – Volume 21

The leaves are turning orange and the cold is setting in in Amsterdam so time for our first autumnal episode of Rhythm and Roots. There is so much great music coming out at the moment that this was a tough one to pull together. A refined selection of music old and new (or sometimes new meets old) from Argentina, Italy, Brazil, Indonesia, Portugal, Ecuador and beyond!

Featured Artist – Populous

Our featured artist for this episode is Populous, otherwise known as Italian producer Andrea Mangia who recently released his first album in six years – Night Safari via Bad Panda Records. His new found sound flitters between old and new influences, marrying worldly samples and rhythms with tight, full electronic productions and featuring an equally eclectic guestlist from fellow Italian tropicalista Clap Clap! to Japanese dream-pop singer Cuushe. Night Safari is scattered with birds, cicadas, deep 808 kick drums, sweet vocals, sweeping synths and scratchy samples: a globetrotting journey from the Himalayas to Brighton Pier.

Populous

Download: 

http://www.groovalizacion.com/IMG/mp3/rhythm_and_roots_radio_-_episode_21.mp3

Tracklist

1) Ulises Conti – D
2) Roquefeller – vuelo
3) Mura Mansa – Miss You
4) Chancha Via Circuito – Sueños en Paraguay
5) Helado Negro – Myself On 2 U
6) Populous – Honey (Feat. Iokol)
7) Zikomo – Champion Riddim
8) Desmond Dekker – Beautiful and Dangerous
9) Thomash – Calango Fumando Palha
10) Nicola Cruz – Cumbia del Olvido
11) Populous – Fall (Feat. Cuushe)
12) Colo – Ghana 95
13) Captain Planet – Cicada
14) Populous – Dead Sea
15) Sono Rhizmo – O Telefone
16) Sidirum – Akasha (Nicola Cruz Remix)
17) Rocky Marciano – Selva Rainha
18) Thomash – Field Recordings in Minas Gerais
19) Grupo Bahia – Recordando (Andrés Digital Remix)
20) Rocky Marciano – Dançante
21) Midnight Runners – Disko Cha Cha Cha
22) Batida – Pobre e Rico
23) Castro – The Vibration is International
24) Von Party – Pygmy Funk
25) Booddha – I Wonder Why
26) AbJo – Kalimba Song

Matanza // Gallineta Chica

Incredibly, we reached over 3,000 Euros today on the Kickstarter. Now just 24 hours to go so still time  to support the ‘A Guide to the Birdsong of South America’ project!

On to artist number 9 and one we are very excited to announce! All the way from the Andino plains of Chile we give you the mysteriously wonderful and entrancing Matanza! The shamanic Chilean trio will be making a track inspired by a special Patagonian species, the Gallineta Chica or Austral Rail.

The Bird – La Gallineta Chica


The Artist – Matanza

www.soundcloud.com/matanza

Hailing from Chile, Matanza are a trio of electronic musical shamans. The band been integral in the folk/electronica movement in Chile n Chile and beyond, breaking new ground with their fresh approach to both Andino folkloric music and electronica. Matanza fuse together the music of their roots, collecting, playing and recording a range of native Latin American instruments like Bombos and Gaitas, with the music they grew up to – the sound of the dancefloor sighting Ricardo Villablobos, Matias Aguayo and the label Dirty Bird as influences. Their productions blur the lines between house, techno and folklore, reinventing, remixing and developing new musical directions and meeting points. In their words: post-modern folk music. In our words: brilliant. Listen below:

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Ana Tijoux – La Bala

Ana Tijoux has become the darling of Latin American hip-hop and her third album, La Bala looks set to cement her position at the top. Tijoux first grabbed people’s attention through her grammy nominated debut album 1977 for her mix of socially conscious lyrics and jazz-infused beats. She continues in this vein on La Bala, partially inspired by the Chilean student movement which leapt onto the world stage last year.

The album sits between Tijoux’s politically charged tracks and her more soulful, laid-back, hip-hop side. La Bala opens like a call to arms with the first three tracks, “Bala”, “Shock” (which deal openly with the protests, see below) and “Desclaficado”. It then settles down with jazz/soul/funk influenced tracks like “Quizas”, “Volver” and the great “Las Horas”, showing Tijoux’s wider influences. The productions throughout are spot-on and there is a healthy helping of lush orchestral strings adding depth to tracks like “Las Horas”.

Ana Tijoux – Las Cosas por su Nombre

On the whole, La Bala walks the line between cutting political rap, clearly inspired by the events in Chile and around the world, and something nearer to jazz-funk-soul (Erykah Badu influenced) than hip-hop, with Tijoux at times, resembling a vocalist more than an MC. Sometimes this just doesn’t work and some tracks, such as “Quizas”, risk slipping into the background but fortunately there are enough top-quality productions to pull the album through. Personally I prefer the socially conscious rapper than the Latin RnB vocalist but each to his own! Still, a couple more positive reviews and this may be the release that really breaks Tijoux outside of her native continent.

You can stream La Bala via NPR, buy it on iTunes now and physically from the 31st. Also worth checking out a nice little Q&A with Tijoux courtesy of Remezcla.

 

Katakresis – Beats Santiaguinos

Katakresis is an American producer currently living in Santiago, Chile. He creates what could be loosely collected together as instrumental hip-hop.

Katakresis – Straight Paraguay (Cabeza! 025)

After having put together Cabeza! Netlabel’s 25th release last year, ‘Beats Santiaguinos’ is a free to download 19 track collection of Katakresis beats old and new. The album is entirely ‘instrumental hip-hop’ but brilliantly varied: a cut-up remix of bossa-nova classic ‘Corcovado‘ (‘Night of Quiet Stars’), the epic BPM traversing ‘Yellow Box Synth’, the digital cumbia of ‘Carlitosnap’,unidentified Latin American folk on ‘Valparaiso Beat’ and a rather curveball Dvořák remix.

To finish with, here is a pretty impressive video of Katakresis playing around on an MPC:

Sunday Mashup #1 – Lido Pimienta meets Daniel Klaüser

I have been trying to think of a catchy name for this new mini-feature but ultimately failed and stuck with the ‘Sunday Mashup’. Simple and effective. As the title may suggest, Rhythm ‘n’ Roots will henceforth publish a mashup every Sunday available for download for one week only. Mashups don’t have to mean simply putting an acapella over an instrumental but can be two songs fused together, two different genres, differing tempos etc. The aim is to create a new sound and a new song, moulded from two different sources, something like the above diagram…

Mueve Maré (Lido Pimienta vs Daniel Klaüser)

The first in the series brings together Chilean producer Daniel Klaüser’s Maré from his Riberalta EP (released through aforementioned Antartek Records) and afore-posted Colombian singer Lido Pimienta‘s Mueve from her Colores EP. Download expired but you can stream here and hit me up if you want a copy 🙂

http://official.fm/tracks/273696?size=small

Chilean Zombie Thriller

Chilean students particpating in a novel form of protest with more than 3,000 students performing the dance moves to Thriller, representing what they see as the death of the Chilean education system. This is the latest in a series of protests in Chile against Conservative/Billionaire President Sebastián Piñera’s new legislative reform program.

Matanza – Apolinar EP

Chilean andean-techno-shamans Matanza arrive on European shores for the first time next month playing a handful of shows and festivals. To coincide with their arrival the group have released Apolinar, a six track EP available for free download here through fresh faced Amsterdam based label Antartek.

Matanza – Apolinar (Daniel Klauser Remix)

Despite being only the third release from Antartek (the first two releases came from fellow Chilean tropicalist Daniel Klaüser), the label states that its mission is to “find the hidden talents of southern countries and expose them to the north”. Once more graphic design is also an integral part of the label with an emphasis on the interaction between graphic artists, video artists and the music. Going on the music and the graphic aesthetics, Antartek seems like a welcome addition to the increasingly crowded “international-tropical bass” scene.